Archive for Medical Transcription

2015 Healthcare Workforce Executive Insights Survey Results

To gain a better understanding of how healthcare industry changes have affected talent management practices, HealthcareSource and the American Society for Healthcare Human Resources Administration (ASHHRA) issued the 2015 Healthcare Workforce Executive Insights Survey. 

More than 400 people at healthcare providers across the country offered their views about how their talent management organizations are adapting to industry changes such as aging demographics, population health, accountable care initiatives, and the rapid growth of retail care clinics.

Check out our infographic for a breakdown of a few key data points.

 

2015 Healthcare Workforce Executive Insights Survey - HealthcareSource and ASHHRA

Eight Ways Physicians Know They’re Overworking

Overwork is not pretty, and in some cultures it’s deadly. In Japan, “karoshi” or death from overwork, annually claims anywhere from 10,000 workers to 30,000 workers. The range is vast because, without autopsies, it’s difficult to accurately assess the cause of death of people at their desks, slumped over.

Karoshi does not appear to be a significant phenomenon in the U.S. Still, among over-workers and the highly fatigued, high blood pressure and heart disease are exceedingly common.

Danger ahead

Given that you work very long hours — why can that be dangerous? When you encounter stressful situations by working longer and harder, your muscles contract, your blood thickens, your heart pumps blood faster, and your arteries narrow. You’re prepared for fight or flight. If you actually did fight or flee, the situation would largely take care of itself.

Instead, your internal “engine” is revving for eight hours to 10 hours on end. You arrive home, where more stressors may emerge. You cannot sleep as many hours as your body requires, or if you do, it’s fitful sleep with tossing and turning. As a result, you’re being worn down and your immune system is becoming weaker. Thus you’re more susceptible to illness.

Some researchers believe that consistently having too little sleep could impact your whole life, to your detriment. Combined with too much work and too little sleep, any illness that you might contract can be more troublesome.

Beyond tired

You feel tired, but when are you bordering on danger? Among many signs, here are a few:

1. Lack of appetite or indigestion. You normally look forward to meals, but when highly fatigued, you have trouble getting them down. Maybe, you’re eating less. Your fatigue is prolonged.

2. Extra sleep doesn’t help. Getting many nights of extra sleep in a row or sleeping for an entire weekend doesn’t seem to diminish your fatigue. Perhaps worse, you feel as if you’ll never “catch up.”

3. Excessive sleepiness. You doze at inopportune moments, such as during an important meeting, or when driving!

4. Loss of sex drive. This isn’t obvious because decline in libido usually occurs a bit at a time and you don’t notice, although your partner likely will.

5. Interrupted sleep. At night, you wake more often or toss and turn, and then, worse, you spend the rest of the night overly concerned that you’re not attaining good sleep.

6. Persistent fatigue. You feel tired upon arising even after a full night’s sleep. Realistically, if, by 9:30 a.m. or 10:00 a.m., you can hardly keep your head up, it’s time to take heed.

7. Poor concentration. Your focus on the task at hand is poor. Your concentration is diminished and is not due to your aging.

8. Feeling ineffective. Finally, you feel that you’re no longer in control. In many ways, this can be the most worrisome of all signs. Roll back your number of working hours as soon as you reasonably can.

If one or more of these has been a lingering issue for you, it’s time to take a personal inventory and make some decisions about how you are going to change things

Source: http://www.physicianspractice.com/blog/eight-ways-physicians-know-theyre-overworking

The Power of Big Data

Harnessing and capitalizing upon the monstrous amounts of available healthcare information

By Peter Edelstein, MD, Elsevier

Big Data. Population Health Management. Patient Engagement.

Healthcare reform churns out buzzwords at an alarming rate.  But at least big data has a more defined meaning, having come to linguistic life long before the Affordable Care Act was a gleam in President Obama’s eye presumably.

Today’s world runs on big data.”  It’s big data that allows millions of us to almost instantaneously receive insurance quotes online; creates your credit score; select a mortgage; and pushes pop-up advertising that just happens to be exactly what you were looking for yesterday.

As is our healthcare industry’s history, big data is yet another capability that has entered the medical arena long after becoming an integral part of non-medical sectors.  That said, big data is (finally) here to stay, in our hospitals, our pharmacies, in our insurance systems (where it has been the longest), and in our ambulatory care centers.

Big Data Goals

And like population health management, patient education, and other buzzwords, understanding our specific big data goals and how to achieve them is critical if we are to maximize the success of healthcare reform.  So the first question is, What Are Our Healthcare Goals for Big Data?

If an underlying goal of healthcare reform itself is to improve the quality and cost efficiency of care for populations and for individual patients, then we must turn away from reactive care provided in the acute, inpatient facility and strive for proactive, preventative, and maintenance care provided in the ambulatory world (both the outpatient physician office and in the place where patients spend virtually 100% of their time:  their homes and workplaces).

Linking to this goal, Big Data can drive the identification of individuals and populations at risk of suboptimal quality and/or cost of care and then to guide intervention to reduce or prevent the realization of the identified risks.

Already, Big Data is playing a foundational role in the first part of this goal.   Monstrous amounts of claims data serve to feed clinical analytics models, including predictive models.  Such powerful tools allow us to predict which patient populations and individuals are at risk of specific forms of clinical deterioration, high cost care, and/or unanticipated hospitalization and Emergency Department visits.

And recently, the incorporation of public records Big Data (including moving, home ownership, eviction, lien, and property value history; estimated annual income, wealth index and financial stress; and accident, fraud, burglary, and criminal history) along with health claims data has allowed for the development of even more powerful predictive analytics models.  (For example, inclusion of such non-medical data may more accurately predict risk of early post-discharge hospital readmission and/or risk of failure to pay).

Big Data Expansion

Today, non-clinical Big Data is expanding from the clinical analytics world into site of health care delivery.  The Institute of Medicine is recommending the inclusion of social and behavioral data within the EHR, where (as with analytics) this expansion of Big Data is projected to more clearly and accurately guide patient care.

Whether empowering clinical analytics models or more clearly defining individual patients and populations from within the EHR, the ultimate impact of our evolving Big Data is in guiding evidence-based content and clinical decision support tools which are targeted to meet the specific needs of an identified patient population, subpopulation, or individual, content which can be pushed to every point of care (hospital, ambulatory setting, patient home, etc.) and delivered in a format appropriate for the specific provider (doctor, nurse, patient, etc.).

As we widen the net of data sources and types included within our analytics models and electronic information systems, we are increasing our ability to hone down, to fine-tune our understanding of specific and populations’ and patients’ risks, needs, and opportunities to improve both the quality and cost efficiency of their care.  To provide the most appropriate evidence-based content wherever it needed, whenever it is needed, for whoever needs it.

Peter Edelstein is chief medical officer, Elsevier Clinical Solutions

The future of the Semantic Web: cultural heritage and privacy

By Dr. Heather Packer, Research fellow, the University of Southampton.


After attending both the International Semantic Web Conference (ISWC) and the Joint International Semantic Technology Conference (JIST), I considered what this meant for research and development in this exciting area.


Some of the most interesting work presented at ISWC and JIST were in the areas of cultural heritage, such as the recording of personal stories, and integrating historic maps with new timelines. This was highlighted in the opening keynote at JIST, which was given by Eero Hyvönen of Aalto University in Finland, presenting its work on using Semantic Web technologies to preserve Finnish cultural heritage.


These included the preservation of ancient shoemaking methods, through the digitisation and documentation using Semantic Web metadata with multimedia, interviews and written sources. Secondly, the complete transcription of the Finnish national epic, the Kalevala, into a Semantic narrative, and the process by which topics are linked from their own ontology portal, so that topical connections in the Kalevala narrative can be made with other Finnish cultural heritage work.


Aalto University’s work shows that Semantic Web technologies, such as its Cultural Sampo ontology portal, allow cultural heritage artefacts and narratives from multiple sources to be brought together and automatically cross-referenced. Examples were shown where the cross-linking between sources has already benefitted researchers, with technical barriers easily overcome.


In the future, I am aiming to work towards a Semantic Web which will allow narratives to share workflows and stories about companies, as opposed to more traditional methods like statistics calculated from databases. These narratives can be used to explain things based on people’s past experiences and their interests (taken from their actions on the web), to make them both more useful and engaging.


One problem, however, arises from where is it acceptable to gather and use data. Many of the people I have spoken to in academia and industry have said that information taken from their emails is too intrusive and people as a whole are unwilling to use such a system. However, people are more willing to adopt systems that use information from social networks where they can freely censor information about themselves.


Yet in my experience the most useful information is often to be found precisely in private online places such as email and calendars. In the future I would like the Semantic Web to allow me to attend a conference in another country, and automatically (with optional and minimal input) handle my flights, hotels, conference registrations and restaurant recommendations based on preferences that I had made in the past, such as price range and hotel recommendations and amenities.


In addition to academic research, the Semantic Web also has applications for business and handling personal data. The latter, in particular, has recently seen its research spurred on by a number of initiatives, including the midata initiative from the UK government’s Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS). The initiative, which is due to start in 2013, mandates that companies must supply data they hold about a person back to that person in a machine readable format, and under an open licence.


The Semantic Web provides an obvious framework for enabling this at low cost to businesses – there are already numerous examples of marking up personal data under appropriate licenses such as the Open Government license used on data.gov.uk. Semantic Web technologies would therefore enable businesses to comply with new data protection legislation in a cost-effective manner. End-users that receive their data will also benefit, because there are numerous analysis, visualisation and storage mechanisms which already work with Semantic Web data.


The need for storing, managing, using and sharing personal data continues to grow. In response, numerous business startups which focus on providing such services have been launched. Meanwhile groups such as the W3C Read Write Web community group are discussing approaches to using Semantic Web techniques for publishing, receiving and sharing private data. For users this means that it will be easier to make their data work for them, including sites that use your data to help you save money, such as Bill Monitor, which analyses your mobile phone bill to find out how much you can save by getting a new phone contract. It is very likely that similar services will exist in the future for other utilities, such as electricity, gas, and broadband.


The future of the Semantic Web is making it easier to access increasingly richer presentations of our history and heritage, and also publish, and thus increase the amount of cultural heritage material being preserved and made available online. The future of personal data is also one which is expanding rapidly, towards the goal of helping people to make more financially beneficial purchases, and to better manage their private data.



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Determining the right tool for your transcription needs

My blogs have always concentrated on providing different ways through transcription process can be made better. This write-up is no different. In this blog; I have mentioned two of the most important dictation tools that reign right now in the transcription domain along with their advantages and disadvantages to showcase their prowess and efficiency to my readers.

As we move into the 21st century, there are probably two most important tools that reign in the medical transcription domain. They are digital recorder and telephone dictation. With times this debate has heightened as in which of these two tools is the most efficient for transcription needs. Now you might be wondering; why I have changed my focus from medical transcriptionists to tools that medical practitioners use for recording their interaction with the patient. As I have already discussed in my previous blogs it has become mandatory for medical practitioners to record their patient records for getting insurance from the insurance companies. Now this is a very crucial component wherein these two tools play a very important role.

Now let me start off with different options that medical practitioners had in the past. The old Dictaphone machines were quite large and stationary. With times; handheld tape recorders were used which were followed by micro and mini-cassette tape recorders. However, it was found that there were lot of limitations in these tools. One of the prime being portable caused the challenge of being lost or misplaced easily. The other limitation was that they needed to be connected with a PC to download the files being transcribed. Now it is not that easy to download the files popping out of a tape, putting in a new one and continue recording. Hence; there was a need to introduce a digital recorder with a removable memory card and a memory card attached to your PC. This was a huge change.

Today medical practitioners have two options as discussed earlier. Both these options require several factors for optimal usage – low ambient or background noise, clear dictation and knowledge of how to use them.

Now digital recorders have the various features of a tape recorder like slide switches for pausing, rewinding and fast forwarding. Less expensive ones have buttons instead of slide switches and it takes quite some time to use them effectively. Handheld recorders are portable that can be carried anywhere which is a great advantage. As the medical practitioner can dictate the notes on the go while examining the patient. But the one limitation of the digital recorders is that the dictation needs to be downloaded on a PC – either through USB cable or a removable storage disk reader and upload it to the transcriptionist’s computer. There are different formats that are provided by the manufacturers but most of them are highly compressed and easily downloaded by the transcriptionist.

On the other hand; telephone dictation systems can be operated only through telephone and that too a landline phone rather than mobile phones. This is done to ensure high quality of recorded voice.  Since they are not portable; medical practitioners cannot use them while examining the patients.  The beauty of this recording system is that once the file is recorded it is automatically saved. It does not require to be uploaded to computer; and then sent to the transcriptionist. The entire file movement is done through the dictation system and is done securely. There is no time delay in uploading the files as they are automatically saved with the system.

Ultimately it is the choice of the medical practitioner to decide on the preferably method for dictation. But medical practitioners who have become habituated to tape recorders now use digital recorders as they are similar in dictation style. Others who have learned dictating through hospital-based telephone use telephone-based dictation system. Then there are others who make their decision based on the system which is more automated. Now in this case telephone dictation system win the race as they can be automatically saved; thereby providing embedded security and queue up the dictation by transcription as soon as the medical practitioner finishes dictating.

Mediscribes, Inc. is one of the fastest growing Medical Transcription & document management systems providers in United States, based in Metro Louisville. Mediscribes is an ISO 9000-2001 certified company, rendering cost-effective consolidated transcription solutions to major hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare facilities in United States. Mediscribes is the most value-providing organization in the market today with a strong presence in America and offshore locations. The firm specializes in providing highly accurate transcription adhering to ADHI guidelines in unbeatable turnaround time with robust & proven document management system as its vantage point to its esteemed clientele.

Mediscribes provides end-to-end transcription solutions as its primary offering. For our customers, we focus on dictation systems, both ASP as well as enterprise level solutions, with the help of our most valued asset   ezVoiceIntelligence (ezVI), providing specialty-specific qualitative transcription along with a “whole nine yards” document management system. Mediscribes specializes in EMR data integration as well. Our data dispatch department is highly proficient in integrating transcribed reports into any type of EMR. Healthcare facilities that do not have EMR get the option to use our web-based file monitoring interface called eTranscribe for global access to their data. eTranscribe has special features of E-signing, E-faxing, auto-printing, and user-friendly document search criteria.

For additional information, please visit http://www.mediscribes.com

Media Contact (Mediscribes)
Mike Perry
marketing@mediscribes.com

Tags: Cardiology Transcription, Medical Dictation, Medical Transcription, Medical Transcription Companies, Medical Transcription Service, Medical Transcription Services, Outsource Medical Transcription, , Transcription Service

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